16th Annual All Nations Pow Wow & Gathering

When:
February 15, 2018 @ 4:00 pm – February 17, 2018 @ 8:00 pm America/Toronto Timezone
2018-02-15T16:00:00-05:00
2018-02-17T20:00:00-05:00
Where:
Various locations
4700 Keele St
Toronto, ON M3J 1P3
Canada
Contact:
Aboriginal Students Association

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The York University 16th Annual All Nations Pow Wow & Gathering will be happening from Thursday, February 15th through Saturday, February 17th, 2018. All events are free of charge, and open to everyone. More info available here -- https://www.facebook.com/events/198263017412240/

Thursday, February 15th: Métis Fiddlers & Jig
Location: Vari Hall, York University Keele Campus, Toronto
Time: 4:00 – 7:00pm (or later, if we’re having a great time)

Friday, February 16th: KISS Conference Discussion Circles
Location: 280N York Lanes, York University Keele Campus, Toronto
10am: Breakfast (muffins, pastries, coffee, etc.)
10:30am: Discussion Circle: Arts & Academia*
12:00: Lunch (NDN Tacos)
1:00pm: Discussion Circle: Land & Activism*
2:30pm: Break (Coffee, Tea, cookies, etc.)
3:00pm: Discussion Circle: Language & Culture*
*With special invited guests

Friday, February 16th: Inuit Feast
Location: 280N York Lanes, York University Keele Campus, Toronto
Time: 5:00 – 8:00pm

Saturday, February 17th: All Nations Pow Wow
Location: Vari Hall, York University Keele Campus, Toronto
Time: Grand Entry at 11:30am
Host drum: Young Creek
Invited drum: Smoke Trail
Invited drum: Charging Horse
MC: Mista Wasis
Arena director: Gary Parker
Elder: TBA
Head female dancer: Jennifer Meness
Head male dancer: TBA

Saturday, February 17th: Gala
Location: The Underground, York University Keele Campus, Toronto
Time: 5:00 – 8:00pm
Live Stand-up Comedy by Manifest Destiny’s Child
Catered by Hiawatha’s Catering

For more information, visit the All Nations Pow Wow & Gathering Facebook page.

More about the history of Pow Wows

Pow wows in North America have a long history spanning hundreds of years. The dancing and drumming featured at pow wows has a dual purpose, serving as both entertainment and playing a key role in conveying traditional teachings. Performers dance for not only those who are present at the event, but for those who cannot dance, the frail, the elderly and the missing.

Prior to the First World War, Indigenous peoples in Canada were not permitted to attend these demonstrations of culture and expression. In 1951, changes to the Federal Indian Act allowed pow wows to go ahead without interference. Contemporary pow wows advance expression of Indigenous culture, knowledge and healing.

Read more in Y-File

Photography credits for the image of the jingle dress dancers: Marissa Magneson.