The Hard Right Populist Insurgency

When:
November 26, 2018 @ 2:30 pm – 4:30 pm America/Toronto Timezone
2018-11-26T14:30:00-05:00
2018-11-26T16:30:00-05:00
Where:
Convention Centre, 2nd Floor, New Student Centre
4700 Keele St
Toronto, ON M3J 1P3
Canada
Cost:
Free
Contact:
Carolyn Cross
416 736 2100 ext 33197

Poster describing Hard Right Roundtable

Please join the Department of Politics for The Hard Right Populist Insurgency: Political Challenges from Budapest to Washington to Toronto, a roundtable. 

Then relax or continue the discussion at a reception following.

To assist with our catering needs, please RSVP by November 21 at The Hard Right RSVP

Roundtable participants:
Greg Albo – Politics
Raju Das – Geography
Stefan Kipfer – Environmental Studies
Andrew Jones – Politics
Heather MacRae – Politics
Viviana Patroni – Development Studies
Ethel Tungohan – Politics

We are at one of those historical moments that compel progressives, from socialists to liberals, to undertake a serious calibration of the political forces amassing on the right.

  • To what extent are we still seeing a further mutation of
    neoliberalism in an increasingly authoritarian form?
  • What is the far right’s social base, organizational strength and range? How far has it penetrated state institutions?
  • What kinds of political formations and alliances might emerge
    to block the rise of the right and begin to offer a social alternative?

See full description below and view the full-sized poster here:  Poster - Hard Right Populist Insurgency - Roundtable 26 Nov 2018

Full Description of the Discussion Topic

It is increasingly clear that we are at one of those historical moments that compel progressives, from socialists to liberals, to undertake a serious calibration of the political forces amassing on the right. This stems partly from the electoral breakthroughs that far-right parties have made in Europe since the global financial crisis and the imposition of an unrelenting austerity that continues to its toll. But not only in Europe. Across the globe the far right is on the move: the great strength of right-wing populism in the US Republican Party under Trump and the Conservative Party in Canada under Harper and now Ford; the CAQ in Quebec and the United Conservative Party in Alberta; the increasing range of state surveillance and intolerance of dissent, features of what some have called ‘post democracy’; the success of the BJP in India and the return of right-wing militarism to the political scene in East Asia; the strength of Putin’s populist authoritarianism in Russia; the continued spread of religious fundamentalisms to almost all quarters of the Middle East and many countries in Africa, with multiple forms of authoritarians governments in response, notably the military dictatorship in Egypt; the ever-increasing strength of the religious right in Israel; and many other examples.

These political shifts portend, at the very least, a reconfiguration of the social forces and political coalitions linked to an increasingly xenophobic and nationalistic politics of what some consider a post-globalization era.  But it is important to take account of the particularities of the new right today in comparison with fascist political movements and states in the 1920s and 1930s, and also in contrast to various types of military and authoritarian regimes of the twentieth century. The classical fascist movements embraced nationalist and protectionist economic policies; it is not at all clear that this is the case today where the radical right targets labour migration while tolerating the internationalization of capital. The same openness to the free movement of capital and the liberalization of domestic markets applies to authoritarian and military regimes today.

Rather than fall into timeless typologies, it is important to ask several important questions. To what extent are we still seeing a further mutation of neoliberalism in an increasingly authoritarian form?   What is the far right’s social base, organizational strength and range? How far has it penetrated state institutions? And what kinds of political formations and alliances might emerge to block the rise of the right and begin to offer a social alternative?